Anti Social Behaviour

What is Anti Social Behaviour?

The law says that anti social behaviour is “any behaviour that causes or is likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress.” It can be anything from low level persistent nuisance to serious violent behaviour. It includes all behaviour that harms residents’ quality of life in and around their homes.

Some examples of anti social behaviour are neighbour nuisance, vandalism and graffiti, noise nuisance, misuse or serious neglect of gardens, nuisance from pets, car crime, drug-related crime, verbal abuse, intimidation, domestic abuse and racial harassment.

Estuary’s Approach:

We aim to promote a safe and secure environment for people to live in and tackling and reducing anti-social behaviour is important to us.
We set out clear requirements of our tenants in Tenancy Agreements and estate wide Good Neighbour Agreements (GNA) and we take enforcement action where appropriate.
Estuary work in partnership with our tenants, leaseholders and other agencies to prevent and deal with anti-social behaviour.

To report ASB please call 0300 304 5000 or fill in our online ASB reporting form.

Before reporting ASB to us:

You should first try speaking to your neighbour. We recommend using a Dear Neighbour Card [pdf] 62KB; it is likely your neighbour would prefer you speak to them first before contacting us, as they may not be aware they are causing a problem.

Crime and CrimeStoppers

If you suspect criminal activity is taking place and you would prefer to report it anonymously, CrimeStoppers are a charity, set up in 1985, to allow just that. In all their years of operating, nobody has ever been identified after giving information about a crime.

From arson to burglary, human trafficking, fraud or drunk or uninsured driving, all these and more can be reported to CrimeStoppers via their website or on 0800 555 111. 

You don't have to give your name and CrimeStoppers are not the police. 

Common Anti-Social Behaviour Myths

At times it can be tricky to understand whether or not a person's actions constitute anti-social behaviour, or where responsibility lies for dealing with ASB. Our ASB Common Myths.pdf[pdf] 103KB document will help to demistify some of these issues.